Simon Finn / Harpoon Group / The Doomed Bird Of providence

Simon Finn / Harpoon Group / The Doomed Bird Of providence
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English psych-folk musician SIMON FINN has now been given another crack at the troubled profession of singer/songwriter, his story the stuff of legend: A lone wolf troubadour from the mid-’60s U.K. scene, he rubbed shoulders with the likes of Bert Jansch. The powerful Pass the Distance, released in 1970 to critical acclaim, was only out for a year before it had to be removed due to the album cover. Nearby to the studio where the album was recorded, was a billboard advertising childrens' shoes which inspired the cover. Clarks Shoes objected, leading to the album being pulled with no funds to re-issue it. Simon remained in London for a further two years before disappearing to North America where he remained for the next 35 years.

Since, a new record has surfaced – capturing the past and the present, a seamless transition despite the quarter century passed. Simon Finn has won over fans worldwide – including Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore and ex-Blur guitarist Graham Coxon – with his passion, his wit and his soul-shaking music.

Aside from his solo shows Simon also plays guitar in a band called Current 93, which were the cover story of the July Wire. In 2006 his original album, Pass the Distance, was re-issued.

HARPOON GROUP is the alias of Dead Rat Orchestra member Robin Alderton, a sometime sound artist, musician, and fine artist who can be found surrounded by antiquated audio technology: dansettes spinning dubplates, reel to reel recorders flailing, clicking dictaphones, overdubbed cassettes and bust samplers. He creates shifting textural compositions out of field recordings, found sounds and the technology itself, considering the process a form of collage. His performances resonate with ideas of sound recording technology, nostalgia, memory and place - the processes of deterioration, and of the failure of (or grasp for) memory.

THE DOOMED BIRD OF PROVIDENCE started out in London in 2009 as a means for Mark Kluzek to write songs about early colonial times in Australia. Kluzek, who had moved from Australia and been living in the UK for some years had read The Fatal Shore by Robert Hughes, a history of convict Australia. His first couple of songs were loosely based on characters in the aforementioned book. Over a period of years a variety of musicians joined Kluzek to perform and record these and other songs - lyrical investigations into tales of horror and misery from Australia’s early history through murder ballads and bloodthirsty shanties.

"Think Nick Cave, Matt Elliott’s solo work, or one of the Constellation droners singing dark folk songs of horror and misery from Australian history." - Norman Records

"Gripping and astonishingly grim music" - Sounds XP

"Uncompromising and at times uncomfortable, these songs remove the usual safety nets and aren't afraid to change the rules. They are becoming one of the bands that you don't want to miss." - Americana UK

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